Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Get Ready for Kindergarten Field Trip: Lois Ehlert

Playing in the kitchen. I've started including some
open playtime for kindergarteners in my field trips.
  • Program goals
    • Introduce pre-kindergarteners to the library
    • Encourage kids to see the library as a fun place
  • Butterflies (Terri) (Community room)
    • Waiting for wings (extra story - Ten little caterpillars)
    • Emerging butterflies from Teaching with favorite Lois Ehlert books
    • Die-cut butterflies, markers, cut-down paper towel tubes, tape
    • Pompom caterpillars, glue dots (optional)
  • Rainbow (Pattie) (Children's Garden)
    • Planting a rainbow
    • Chalk (draw flowers on the sidewalk squares)
    • Additional activities
      • Water play
      • Bubbles
  • Matching magnets (Jennifer) (Storyroom)
    • Oodles of animals; Lots of spots (extra story - Color Zoo)
    • Magnets (each kid gets 2 each of circles, squares, and strips)
    • Shaped stickers
    • Kids match up the stickers and magnets (they have to check on the magnetic chalkboard to put their stickers on the right side!) then match and make different shapes/animals
  • Open playtime (teachers) (Play Area)
    • including Lois Ehlert magnet games on blackboard

Friday, June 14, 2019

We Explore Art: Eric Carle


  • Program Goals:
    • Introduce Eric Carle and his art
    • Encourage gross and fine motor skills (ripping, painting)
    • Attendance: 10
Art Project Part 1: Painting (10-10:15)
As the kids come in, they get aprons and start painting. I remind everyone to write their names at their spots, not to paint too thickly and pass out paper towels to blot the paintings. I just used a couple colors. Then we blot them with paper towels and left them to dry. This takes about 15 minutes. I start gathering the kids to the rug for storytime after 15 minutes, but latecomers continue painting.
 
Supplies
  • Paint (red, blue, green) 
  • 8x11 white construction paper 
  • paint brushes, paper towels, aprons 
Storytime (10:15-10:40)
I start with the Very Hungry Caterpillar puppet and book. After this interactive story, we read more Eric Carle books. Depending on the audience, I talk about animal sounds, counting, coloring techniques, imagination, texture, etc.

Books
  • Very Hungry Caterpillar (puppet program) 
  • The Very Busy Spider 
  • 1, 2, 3 To the zoo 
  • The artist who painted a blue horse 
  • Hello Red Fox (school age)
Art Project Part 2: Collage (10:40-11)
Everyone went back to their paintings and cut them up, then glued them onto the paper to make collages. More paper towels may be needed for things that are not quite dry.

Supplies
  • 8x12 white construction paper 
  • Scissors, Glue 
  • paper towels 
Display: Eric Carle books

Evaluation

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Library on the Go Summer 2019


You can read more about my previous Library on the Go ventures and the origins in the earlier Library on the Go posts. Prior to summer I was given $500 from the Friends of the Library and purchased additional/new easy readers, graphic beginning chapters, and for the first time Spanish! I also took Library on the Go to two first grade classes during school visits/field trips at the end of the year. I also updated the bookmark so that, instead of having a schedule on one side and separate Spanish and English bookmarks, it has Spanish on one side and English on the other - I decided the schedule didn't matter.


  • 6-12-19: The Learning Curve
    • I visited three year olds but just to read. In the four year old room I read That's not bunny, One day in the eucalyptus, eucalyptus tree, and Whoopsie, they decorated bookmarks (I forgot the stickers but remembered the stamper markers) and they each checked out one book. There were about 12 kids.
    • There were about 30 school-agers. I read them Whoopsie by Andrew Cangelose then left bookmarks and stampers with half of them in one room and went into the other room where I signed them up for summer reading and checked out 1-2 books for each kid.
    • I checked out a total of 65 books and signed up approximately 30 kids for summer reading. I don't care how much shelving there is, next time I'm bringing my aide, this was far too chaotic to do on my own. Luckily one of the teachers helped hand out book bags and bookmarks.

Summer Reading

Summer reader with their Lego
activity bag creation
Schedule
  • Day after Memorial Day - online registration for kids only begins
  • 2nd Saturday in June (or the Saturday after school ends) - registration for all ages
  • Week of July 4th - no regular programs, closed for July 4th
  • Last week of July - regular programs/storytimes end.
  • 2nd Saturday in August - summer reading ends
Everyone receives a prize when they sign up - fantasy-themed bookmarks, buttons, etc. donated by a local artist (or extra buttons from other events)
Registration for all groups is kept on an online spreadsheet. I record Name, Age/Grade, and School. (Online registration is just a google form - it automatically takes you to the calendar when you fill it out).

During field trips I hand out summer promo bookmarks. They have an image or pattern on one side to color in and a reminder to sign up for summer reading and a "did you know" about the library on the back.

Kids program, age 0 to 5th grade

  • There is a June, July, and (partial) August calendar. I update the calendars with new activities every year. Kids can get stickers for days completed and each week they visit the library they get a different activity bag. The June calendar is returned for a selection of coupons provided by our consortium, the July calendar for a free book, and the August calendar for a "surprise" - either a free book or a special ticket to our local fair. We do not track minutes, pages, or anything really. I just hand out stickers and the activity bags are tied to library visits, not tracking reading.
  • Sample calendar
  • Activity bags (I don't use all of these every year - I update and change as needed)
Middle School
  • Middle schoolers put their receipt or fill out a card, into a box each week. We don't actually do anything with these, it just gives them a sense of fulfillment. Then they get to pick a colored marble. White (most plentiful) let's them choose from a variety of small items (crocheted bags, candy, misc. stuff I've collected), blue gives them a full-size candy bar, and red gives them a free book. They can pick one marble each week.
  • Do I KNOW that they are reading? No. But I figure if they're in the library checking stuff out, reading is likely to happen at some point. Do some kids get more than one prize a week? Probably. I'm too busy to care.
  • At some point we might reinstitute a drawing of some kind, but we usually have over 100 middle schoolers signed up and it's very difficult to run. I do rig the marbles a little near the end to make sure everyone gets at least one "good" prize.
High School
  • I just borrowed our adult summer reading program. They get a raffle ticket for each book they read, they can read up to about 30 books, and my associate solicits prizes. Usually small coupons from local businesses and books.
Resources
Notes
  • 2019
    • Legos as an activity bag were a huge hit this year. The middle schoolers would like something tangible to take, like a log, but since they just lose everything anyways I'm not eager to waste the paper.

Thursday, June 6, 2019

3rd grade field trip


This was a new field trip in 2018 and I chose an art theme.

Books

  • The book of mistakes by Corinna Luyken (2019)
  • I can only draw worms by Will Mabbitt (2019)
Art Projects
  • Progressive drawing
    • Cover tables in white paper. All the kids get colored pencils.
    • They start a drawing, then every 30 seconds I ping a bell and they move on to the next drawing and continue it.
  • Fingerpaint (outside)
    • Giant fingerpaint shapes, fingerpaint paper
  • Wet chalk painting (outside)
    • Chalk, pool with water (also doubles to clean off in)
  • Outdoor activities
    • Bubbles, hula hoops, jump ropes

Notes

  • 2019
    • It's easiest to have all the outdoor activities available and then teachers can say if they're up for painting or not. One of my associates runs the outdoor portion and I think they draw hopscotch or other games or something. This year I added the option for checkout, if they had a library card. I need to do some work on how I handle class lists and kids checking out next year, but it went well for a first year. The main drawback of this program is that if the weather doesn't cooperate it does not translate at all well to being moved to the school and some schools require parent permission slips for the kids to check out. I'm thinking that next time, if I'm at the school, I will have at least 2 additional staff to handle check out and I will do continuous drawing by giving each kid a piece of paper and a colored pencil and then having them hand it to the kid on their right when the bell pings.