Saturday, June 29, 2019

I Survived program

  • Program goals
    • Encourage interests in science and history
    • Saturday program for school-age children
    • Attendance: 50
I Survived the Shark Attacks of 1916
  • Photo op - Cardboard cut-out of shark mouth, created by various staff
  • Craft - mini sharks
    • Die cut cardboard fish
    • Scissors, markers
  • Experiment - fake blood
    • corn syrup, corn starch, flour, red food coloring, water
    • bowls, sink, cleaning materials
    • paint brushes
  • Decorations
    • mini sharks with shark facts
  • Resources
I Survived Hurricane Katrina, 2005
I Survived the Children's Blizzard, 1888
  • Storm in a jar
    • paint, baby oil, glitter, alka seltzer
    • jars and/or clear water bottles
  • Resources
I Survived the San Francisco earthquake, 1906
I Survived the Nazi Invasion, 1944
I Survived the destruction of Pompeii, AD 79
  • Vinegar and baking soda volcanoes
    • vinegar, baking soda (we used about 6-8 jugs of vinegar and a very large bag of soda)
    • washable paint, balloons
    • milk jugs or soda bottles, swimming pools
I Survived the sinking of the Titanic, 1912
  • Boats
    • Popsicle sticks, duct tape, corks, styrofoam plates
    • Ice chunks
    • Swimming pools
General resources

Friday, June 28, 2019

We Explore Art: Tom Lichtenheld

  • Program Goals
    • Introduce Tom Lichtenheld and his art
    • Experiment with artistic techniques
    • Offer a summer program for camps/daycares
    • Attendance: Varies
Art Project Part 1: Sketching
I encouraged the kids to sketch out their ideas with pencils and erasers. I had lots of pictures of Tom Lichtenheld's art processes from Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast.

Supplies
  • pencils, erasers
  • paper
Storytime
Sing the Storytime Song to call people to the rug.

Books
  • Sing by Joe Raposo
  • Shark vs. Train by Chris Barton
  • Ten rules of the birthday wish by Beth Ferry
  • Exclamation point by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
Art Project Part 2: Colored pencils
The kids color their drawings with colored pencils; there are also activity sheets.

Supplies
  • colored pencils
  • activity sheets
  • paper
Resources

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Art workshop: Ink marbling

  • Program Goals
    • Drop-in program for all ages
    • Experiment with art techniques and supplies
    • Build fine motor skills
    • Attendance: 20

Supplies
  • Colorations ultimate art paper
  • Cardstock
  • Construction paper
  • other scrap paper
  • Muslin scraps
  • Suminagashi marbling inks (purchased on Amazon)
  • tubs, water source (hose), ice cub trays, paintbrushes, aprons
  • paper scraps, pens, paper clips
How it works
  • Kids use the paintbrushes to tap, paint, drip, or splatter ink into the tubs, which are filled with about two inches of water. Then they drop the paper or muslin in, peel it out, and it transfers the design to the item. The paper scraps are to label the kids' art with their names
  • The main effort involved in this is my staff (I scheduled both teens) emptying and refilling the water tubs and labeling and moving the marbled art out to dry.
Evaluation

Friday, June 21, 2019

We Explore Art: Katherine Tillotson

  • Program Goals
    • Introduce Katherine Tillotson and her art
    • Experiment with artistic techniques
    • Attendance: 10
Art Project Part 1: Collage
Tillotson primarily uses watercolors, but she does include collage techniques especially in It's picture day today!
  • Supplies
    • Paper scrap tub
    • Buttons, sparkles, feathers
    • Paper
    • Scissors, glue sticks
Storytime
Sing the Storytime Song to call people to the rug.
  • Books
    • It's picture day today by Megan McDonald
    • All the water in the world by George Ella Lyon
    • Shoe dog by Megan McDonald
    • All ears all eyes by Richard Jackson
Art Project Part 2: Liquid watercolors
The watercolors are poured into ice cube trays
  • Liquid watercolors
  • Aprons, sink, paper towels, tables covered
  • Paint brushes, ice cube trays

Evaluation

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Get Ready for Kindergarten Field Trip: Lois Ehlert

Playing in the kitchen. I've started including some
open playtime for kindergarteners in my field trips.
  • Program goals
    • Introduce pre-kindergarteners to the library
    • Encourage kids to see the library as a fun place
  • Butterflies (Terri) (Community room)
    • Waiting for wings (extra story - Ten little caterpillars)
    • Emerging butterflies from Teaching with favorite Lois Ehlert books
    • Die-cut butterflies, markers, cut-down paper towel tubes, tape
    • Pompom caterpillars, glue dots (optional)
  • Rainbow (Pattie) (Children's Garden)
    • Planting a rainbow
    • Chalk (draw flowers on the sidewalk squares)
    • Additional activities
      • Water play
      • Bubbles
  • Matching magnets (Jennifer) (Storyroom)
    • Oodles of animals; Lots of spots (extra story - Color Zoo)
    • Magnets (each kid gets 2 each of circles, squares, and strips)
    • Shaped stickers
    • Kids match up the stickers and magnets (they have to check on the magnetic chalkboard to put their stickers on the right side!) then match and make different shapes/animals
  • Open playtime (teachers) (Play Area)
    • including Lois Ehlert magnet games on blackboard
Evaluation

Friday, June 14, 2019

We Explore Art: Eric Carle


  • Program Goals:
    • Introduce Eric Carle and his art
    • Encourage gross and fine motor skills (ripping, painting)
    • Attendance: 10
Art Project Part 1: Painting (10-10:15)
As the kids come in, they get aprons and start painting. I remind everyone to write their names at their spots, not to paint too thickly and pass out paper towels to blot the paintings. I just used a couple colors. Then we blot them with paper towels and left them to dry. This takes about 15 minutes. I start gathering the kids to the rug for storytime after 15 minutes, but latecomers continue painting.
 
Supplies
  • Paint (red, blue, green) 
  • 8x11 white construction paper 
  • paint brushes, paper towels, aprons 
Storytime (10:15-10:40)
I start with the Very Hungry Caterpillar puppet and book. After this interactive story, we read more Eric Carle books. Depending on the audience, I talk about animal sounds, counting, coloring techniques, imagination, texture, etc.

Books
  • Very Hungry Caterpillar (puppet program) 
  • The Very Busy Spider 
  • 1, 2, 3 To the zoo 
  • The artist who painted a blue horse 
  • Hello Red Fox (school age)
Art Project Part 2: Collage (10:40-11)
Everyone went back to their paintings and cut them up, then glued them onto the paper to make collages. More paper towels may be needed for things that are not quite dry.

Supplies
  • 8x12 white construction paper 
  • Scissors, Glue 
  • paper towels 
Display: Eric Carle books

Evaluation

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Summer Reading

Summer reader with their Lego
activity bag creation
Schedule
  • Day after Memorial Day - online registration for kids only begins
  • 2nd Saturday in June (or the Saturday after school ends) - registration for all ages
  • Week of July 4th - no regular programs, closed for July 4th
  • Last week of July - regular programs/storytimes end.
  • 2nd Saturday in August - summer reading ends
Everyone receives a prize when they sign up - fantasy-themed bookmarks, buttons, etc. donated by a local artist (or extra buttons from other events)
Registration for all groups is kept on an online spreadsheet. I record Name, Age/Grade, and School. (Online registration is just a google form - it automatically takes you to the calendar when you fill it out).

During field trips I hand out summer promo bookmarks. They have an image or pattern on one side to color in and a reminder to sign up for summer reading and a "did you know" about the library on the back.

Kids program, age 0 to 5th grade

  • There is a June, July, and (partial) August calendar. I update the calendars with new activities every year. Kids can get stickers for days completed and each week they visit the library they get a different activity bag. The June calendar is returned for a selection of coupons provided by our consortium, the July calendar for a free book, and the August calendar for a "surprise" - either a free book or a special ticket to our local fair. We do not track minutes, pages, or anything really. I just hand out stickers and the activity bags are tied to library visits, not tracking reading.
  • Sample calendar
  • Activity bags (I don't use all of these every year - I update and change as needed)
Middle School
  • Middle schoolers put their receipt or fill out a card, into a box each week. We don't actually do anything with these, it just gives them a sense of fulfillment. Then they get to pick a colored marble. White (most plentiful) let's them choose from a variety of small items (crocheted bags, candy, misc. stuff I've collected), blue gives them a full-size candy bar, and red gives them a free book. They can pick one marble each week.
  • Do I KNOW that they are reading? No. But I figure if they're in the library checking stuff out, reading is likely to happen at some point. Do some kids get more than one prize a week? Probably. I'm too busy to care.
  • At some point we might reinstitute a drawing of some kind, but we usually have over 100 middle schoolers signed up and it's very difficult to run. I do rig the marbles a little near the end to make sure everyone gets at least one "good" prize.
High School
  • I just borrowed our adult summer reading program. They get a raffle ticket for each book they read, they can read up to about 30 books, and my associate solicits prizes. Usually small coupons from local businesses and books.
Resources
Notes
  • 2019
    • Legos as an activity bag were a huge hit this year. The middle schoolers would like something tangible to take, like a log, but since they just lose everything anyways I'm not eager to waste the paper.

Thursday, June 6, 2019

3rd grade field trip


This was a new field trip in 2018 and I chose an art theme.

Books

  • The book of mistakes by Corinna Luyken (2019)
  • I can only draw worms by Will Mabbitt (2019)
Art Projects
  • Progressive drawing
    • Cover tables in white paper. All the kids get colored pencils.
    • They start a drawing, then every 30 seconds I ping a bell and they move on to the next drawing and continue it.
  • Fingerpaint (outside)
    • Giant fingerpaint shapes, fingerpaint paper
  • Wet chalk painting (outside)
    • Chalk, pool with water (also doubles to clean off in)
  • Outdoor activities
    • Bubbles, hula hoops, jump ropes

Notes

  • 2019
    • It's easiest to have all the outdoor activities available and then teachers can say if they're up for painting or not. One of my associates runs the outdoor portion and I think they draw hopscotch or other games or something. This year I added the option for checkout, if they had a library card. I need to do some work on how I handle class lists and kids checking out next year, but it went well for a first year. The main drawback of this program is that if the weather doesn't cooperate it does not translate at all well to being moved to the school and some schools require parent permission slips for the kids to check out. I'm thinking that next time, if I'm at the school, I will have at least 2 additional staff to handle check out and I will do continuous drawing by giving each kid a piece of paper and a colored pencil and then having them hand it to the kid on their right when the bell pings.

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

4th grade field trip

2018 was the first year for a fourth grade field trip. In 2019, I added checking out books. The program is in two parts and I split the kids in two groups. Half of them get about 10 minutes of booktalking and 20 minutes to select and check out books. If they don't have a card, they can take book cards. I had bags with their names on file labels so they wouldn't lose their books.
The other half spend about 15 minutes playing life-size Pac-Man and 15 minutes playing giant Boggle. My associate created the Boggle and has some ideas for more life-size games in the future that we could add. It depends on the teachers and whether they're able to stay a little longer though.

Booktalking cards
Instructions for Pac-Man

I picked up ideas for Pac-Man from a variety of places, but mostly from Teen Services Underground

Notes

  • 2019
    • Minimum staff needed is 3 - me to run booktalking, 1 to run Boggle, and 1 to run Pac-man. Additional staff would make check-out easier. I have so far had the Community room available, but if not it could be moved to the lobby.

Kindergarten Field Trip: We are in a book!

  • Program Goals
    • Introduce kids to the library as a fun place
Storytime
  • We are in a book by Mo Willems
    • Talk about all the books in the library and how Elephant and Piggie get read again each time they are checked out.
  • Other titles
    • We're in the wrong book by Richard Byrne
    • Misunderstood Shark; Friends don't eat friends by Ame Dyckman (2019)
    • The itchy book by Leuyen Pham (2019)
    • The panda problem by Deborah Underwood (2019)
    • I can only draw worms by Will Mabbitt (2019)
Art project

Movement
  • Obstacle course from Winter Wigglers
    • We have a simplified version for this field trip
  • Pennies for the wishing well
  • Playtime!
Notes

  • 2019
    • Staff cut out all the puppet pieces - next year if we have time it might be nice to pack them inside the paper bags
    • I also gave them their summer reading bookmarks to color and it would be nice to the legos in the storyroom and the main program in the community room.
    • Ideal staffing - me and one assistant in the community room for storytime and craft, 1-2 staff supervising play in the library.

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

First Grade: Let's Read!

  • Program Goals
    • Introduce kids to the library
    • Give them something to take back home and interest parents in the library
    • Make the library a fun destination
Bingo Scavenger Hunt 15-20 minutes
  • Explain how the game works
    • Stay in the children's area
    • Try not to run and yell
    • Mark off the pictures on your bingo sheet with the crayon, then get a sticker and turn your crayon in for a penny for the wishing well
  • The bingo game is a bunch of pictures of things in the children's area, scrambled. We usually have to redo it each time b/c things change. You can see the original game boards here.
  • You can either have them find everything and get one sticker or actually mark off lines of pictures and get multiple stickers. Depends on how much time you have.
Storytime 10-15 minutes
  • If you time this right, the kids can draw on the back of their bingo sheets while they listen.
  • Selections
    • A library book for bear by Bonnie Baker
    • The Midnight library by Kazuno Kohara
  • The first is good for talking about finding out things you're interested in in the library; the second is a great explanation of how the library has many different things to do and places for different things.
  • Additional titles
    • The Panda Problem by Deborah Underwood (2019)
    • I can only draw worms by Will Mabbitt (2019)
    • Misunderstood shark; Friends don't eat friends by Ame Dyckman
Notes
  • 2019
    • This can get very chaotic; it's key to know the teachers and whether they'll feel comfortable with this or not. Next time I'd put some barriers or at least a tape line down to keep the kids in the children's area and make it easier to prevent straying. I wanted to have playtime after stories, including Legos in the storyroom, so they didn't really keep their bingo sheets. I distributed summer reading bookmarks via the teachers. I need a loud whistle to get the kids' attention, my bell doesn't ping loudly enough.

2nd Grade Community Walk

  • Program Goals: 
    • Introduce kids to the library and its role in the community
    • Introduce kids and teachers to the different functions of library staff
    • Give kids and teachers a sense of community ownership of the library
    • Promote school/library cooperation
10-15 Minute Tour
  • Start upstairs at the director’s office
    • The director is the principal of the library. She helps everyone do their jobs, makes sure the library runs smoothly and represents the library to the community.
  • Adult services
    • Mr. Robinson and his helpers do all the things for grown-ups that we do for kids - fun programs, new books, helps with computers and visits people who can’t come to the library.
  • Downstairs - Information desk
    • A place for grown-ups to ask questions. Kids can ask questions here too, if there is no one at the children’s desk!
  • Circulation
    • This is where the materials circulate. Circulation staff help keep track of who checks out what, remind you to return your books, put the books away, and answer questions about checking out books, fines, etc.
  • Children’s desk
    • This is where kids can ask questions! If you need help finding something, want a recommendation for a good book, need help with your homework, or want to find out what’s going on for kids in the library. Only Ms. Jennifer and Ms. Terri work here, so if there isn’t someone at the children’s desk you can go ask up front.
  • Technical services
    • Ms. Barnes is in charge of putting all the information about the books into the computer, so we can find them in the catalog.
    • Ms. Lisa puts the covers on the books and fixes the broken books.
    • MAGIC TAPE
    • Discussion of where new materials (and the money for them) comes from
  • Back to circulation - go through the work room to Storyroom
10-15 Minute Craft and Storytime
  • Storytime
  • Decorate people who are important in the community. Kids leave people to be put up on the wall. Try to discourage ninjas. There are no ninjas in Elkhorn and if there were they would not be an important part of the community.
  • Books
    • The Fox in the library by Pauli (change the sentence about only checking out 10 books)
    • The Book that eats people by Perry
    • The Not so quiet library by Zachariah Ohora
  • Supplies
    • die cut gingerbread people (large)
    • markers
Notes
  • 2019
    • This was originally meant to be part of the schools' community walks around town, but I ended up using it for summer field trips. That means that some of the kids, depending on the school, have already heard some of it. I adapt and shorten as needed, and if I have a very large group let half of them make die-cut puppets while I take half around and then switch. 40 is the absolute upper limit for this tour, since it's very talk-intensive.